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Code and machines and cars and stuff.

twitter.com/flimshaw:

    explorationimages:

Far side of the moon, from Apollo 16, April 1972.

Apollo 16 metric camera image of the Moon’s eastern limb and far side. The lower left part of the image shows a portion of the moon visible from Earth. The dark area at the 8:00 position on the edge is Mare Crisium. To the right of that is Mare Smythii. The upper right area shows the heavily cratered lunar far side. The Moon is 3475 km in diameter and North is at 10:30 in this image. (Apollo 16, AS16-3021)

    explorationimages:

    Far side of the moon, from Apollo 16, April 1972.

    Apollo 16 metric camera image of the Moon’s eastern limb and far side. The lower left part of the image shows a portion of the moon visible from Earth. The dark area at the 8:00 position on the edge is Mare Crisium. To the right of that is Mare Smythii. The upper right area shows the heavily cratered lunar far side. The Moon is 3475 km in diameter and North is at 10:30 in this image. (Apollo 16, AS16-3021)

    (via thedemon-hauntedworld)

    — 1 week ago with 212 notes

    ageofdestruction:

    erin: Surface of Mars, photographed by Mars Express, 19th June 2008.

    Section of the Gemina Lingula lobe of the north polar cap at top, down across the Gemini Scopuli toward the northern lowlands of the Vastitas Borealis at bottom. Around 80°N 30°E.

    Composite of 3 visible light images for colour, and 1 monochrome frame foe detail. 

    Image credit: ESA.  Composite: AgeOfDestruction.

    (via thedemon-hauntedworld)

    — 3 weeks ago with 306 notes
    Joke startup or real startup?  A new game I like to play.

    Joke startup or real startup? A new game I like to play.

    — 3 weeks ago
    "In two years, we’ll be stewing in the kind of cybernetic morass William Gibson would have written about ironically to make a point about global capitalism."
    Tycho Brahe (@TychoBrahe)

    (Source: penny-arcade.com, via stevewyshywaniuk)

    — 3 weeks ago with 1 note
    ohstarstuff:

I would do anything to experience this in person someday. Expedition 40 Flight Engineer Reid Wiseman captured this image of the stars as the ISS orbits Earth.

    ohstarstuff:

    I would do anything to experience this in person someday. Expedition 40 Flight Engineer Reid Wiseman captured this image of the stars as the ISS orbits Earth.

    (via thedemon-hauntedworld)

    — 3 weeks ago with 335 notes
    Poem #53134

    beatnikbox:

    murder me already
    and flats
    by hands saintly
    spit forgetful Chinaman
    a hipsters saintly
    screaming saintly
    instinctively wrote

    — 1 month ago with 2 notes

    The Lagoon and Trifid nebulae, and the Andromeda galaxy

    — 1 month ago with 18 notes
    #astronomy  #astrophotography  #lagoon nebula  #andromeda 

    A poem by Pat Collins to her husband on the eve of Apollo 11.

    **To a Husband Who Must Seek the Stars**
    
    In your eyes the first glad token
    As when first our love we proved,
    So your mind to mine has spoken
    Just as if your lips had moved.
    
    You are saying-- yes, I know-
    That the lure of space beguiles.
    You are pleading--"Let me go,"
    Not unwilling, but with smiles.
    
    Can you love me, and still choose
    Whispers that I cannot hear?
    Late to love, how can I bear to lose
    Content for some inconstant sphere?
    
    Tell me how you see my role-
    To stay, to wait, yet yearn to go.
    Where is the comfort for my soul?
    You, my love, have helped me know:
    
    I'll be unafraid, undaunted.
    Yes of course! I need not face
    Any peril; or be haunted
    By the hazards you embrace.
    
    I could have sought by wit or wile
    Your bright dream to dim. And yet
    If I'd swayed you with a smile
    My reward would be regret.
    
    So, for once, you shall not hear
    Of the tears, unbidden, welling;
    Or the nighttime stabs of fear.
    These, this time, are not for telling.
    
    Take my silence, though intended;
    Fill it with the joy you feel.
    Take my courage, now pretended--
    You, my love, will make it real
    
    — 1 month ago with 5 notes
    #apollo 11  #astronauts  #michael collins  #nasa 
    I’m going on vacation tomorrow to Palm Springs for a week, and I’m taking 4 different lenses of the 6 I have kicking around.  Here’s each and why, in order of maximum focal length:

28mm 1.8 is for astrophotography and landscapes.  It’s kinda big and the most expensive one I’ve got, but it’s super fast and nice and wide on a full frame without being fisheyed.
40mm 2.8 pancake because it’s tiny, and it’s the one you grab if you don’t want to think about what you might have to shoot.  It always works, is super sharp, and has a perfect and quick fast autofocus.
A vintage Nikkor 100mm 2.8 that I think would be a great astrophotography lens, really fast and sharp, and ridiculously clean for 40+ years old.  The Andromeda Galaxy is four times as big as a full moon in the sky, and you can get nice shots of it with a 100mm that’s an f4, and an f2.8 will let in twice as much light. Using the 500 rule, you can take about a 5 second exposure with a 100mm before you get star trails.  It’s kind of like the 50mm of the sky, or at least that’s what I’m gonna find out in Joshua Tree.  If I felt fancy, it really wouldn’t be bad just takin’ some snappers by the pool either.
And a huge 70mm-300mm f4-5.6 zoom for I don’t really know what. We’ll be in Joshua Tree, it might be nice to snag some deep zooms off a mountain or something.  Or if we decide to film a western, this would be important to have.
I know everybody says just bring one 50mm lens but damnit, I have reasons.  Until someone makes a tack sharp 28-300mm f1.8 that fits in your pocket, there’s different lenses for different jobs.  I guess it’s just a question of how many jobs you want to do and why on your vacation.  I’ll get back to you on that one.

    I’m going on vacation tomorrow to Palm Springs for a week, and I’m taking 4 different lenses of the 6 I have kicking around. Here’s each and why, in order of maximum focal length:

    • 28mm 1.8 is for astrophotography and landscapes. It’s kinda big and the most expensive one I’ve got, but it’s super fast and nice and wide on a full frame without being fisheyed.

    • 40mm 2.8 pancake because it’s tiny, and it’s the one you grab if you don’t want to think about what you might have to shoot. It always works, is super sharp, and has a perfect and quick fast autofocus.

    • A vintage Nikkor 100mm 2.8 that I think would be a great astrophotography lens, really fast and sharp, and ridiculously clean for 40+ years old. The Andromeda Galaxy is four times as big as a full moon in the sky, and you can get nice shots of it with a 100mm that’s an f4, and an f2.8 will let in twice as much light. Using the 500 rule, you can take about a 5 second exposure with a 100mm before you get star trails. It’s kind of like the 50mm of the sky, or at least that’s what I’m gonna find out in Joshua Tree. If I felt fancy, it really wouldn’t be bad just takin’ some snappers by the pool either.

    • And a huge 70mm-300mm f4-5.6 zoom for I don’t really know what. We’ll be in Joshua Tree, it might be nice to snag some deep zooms off a mountain or something. Or if we decide to film a western, this would be important to have.

    I know everybody says just bring one 50mm lens but damnit, I have reasons. Until someone makes a tack sharp 28-300mm f1.8 that fits in your pocket, there’s different lenses for different jobs. I guess it’s just a question of how many jobs you want to do and why on your vacation. I’ll get back to you on that one.

    — 1 month ago with 6 notes
    #photography  #lenses  #cameras  #palm springs